CDC Releases Vital Signs Fact Sheets on Sepsis Prevention and Recognition

In an effort to amplify Sepsis Awareness Month throughout September, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released Vital Signs Sepsis Fact Sheets. These resources highlight importance of prevention and recognition for sepsis, a complication caused by the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to infection, which can ultimately lead to organ failure and death. The new CDC Vital Signs Fact Sheets provide evidence citing opportunities for providers to play a key role in sepsis prevention, including one evaluation identifying that 7 in 10 patients with sepsis had recently used health care services or had chronic diseases requiring frequent medical care.

The fact sheets include guidance for healthcare providers on preventing and recognizing sepsis as well as information on the critical role of state and local health departments in promoting sepsis prevention. Additionally, the CDC invites everyone to share their own experiences with sepsis on Twitter and Facebook using the hashtag #ThinkSepsis to raise awareness for this month and key public health issue. Visit the CDC’s Vital Signs website to find more information and materials for download.

About Anastasia Sonneman

Anastasia Sonneman serves as a Communications Specialist at NACCHO. Her work includes promoting local health departments' best practices, as well as partner tools and resources, in environmental health, health and disability, and preparedness through NACCHO's communications channels, storytelling, and outreach to various audiences.

2 thoughts on “CDC Releases Vital Signs Fact Sheets on Sepsis Prevention and Recognition

  1. Sarah
    October 9, 2016 at 8:52 am

    I am wondering about how the current flooding in the US affects sepsis and what threat there actually is of getting sepsis in a flood zone? if HIV is present?

    1. Kim Rodgers
      October 10, 2016 at 9:09 am

      Hi Sarah, thanks for your question! Please email infectiousdiseases@naccho.org for more information.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *