CDC Analysis Shows National Trends in HIV Diagnosis from 2005-2014

The CDC released a new national analysis that showed an almost 20% decline in HIV diagnoses in the United States from 2005 to 2014. Unfortunately, the same level of success was not seen among all gay and bisexual men and in Southern states. Read the full press release.

Among the findings:

  • From 2005-2014, the annual number of HIV diagnoses in the United States declined 19% (from 48,795 to 39,718 per year) – driven by substantial declines among heterosexuals (down 35%) and people who inject drugs (down 63%).
  • HIV diagnoses among black women were cut nearly in half, from 8,020 to 4,623 over the 2005-2014 period (42% decline), with continuing declines in recent years (25% since 2010).
  • Diagnoses among gay and bisexual men overall increased about 6% over the decade (from 25,155 to 26,612), but stabilized in more recent years (a less than 1% increase from 26,386 to 26,612).
  • Among white gay and bisexual men, diagnoses dropped steadily – both over the decade (decreasing 18% from 9,966 to 8,207) and in more recent years (decreasing 6% from 8,766 to 8,207).
  • Over the decade, diagnoses among black gay and bisexual men increased by 22% (from 8,235 to 10,080) but stabilized in more recent years (a less than 1% increase, from 10,013 to 10,080).
  • Further, while black gay and bisexual men ages 13-24 experienced a steep increase (87% from 2,094 to 3,923) in diagnoses over the decade, diagnoses among young black gay and bisexual men actually declined by 2% (from 3,994 to 3,923) in the most recent years.
  • Finally, diagnoses continued to increase among Latino gay and bisexual men – both over the decade (by 24% from 5,492 to 6,829) and in more recent years (by 13% from 6,060 to 6,829).

About Alyssa Kitlas

Alyssa Kitlas serves as a Program Analyst on NACCHO's HIV, STI, and Viral Hepatitis team. Her work includes projects on HIV, STI, and Viral Hepatitis prevention and care. Twitter: @AlyssaKitlas

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